International Center of Excellence for Malaria Research (ICEMR)
Program for Resistance, Immunology, Surveillance and Modeling of Malaria in Uganda (PRISM)

Program Directors: Grant Dorsey, UCSF; Professor Moses Kamya, Makerere University/IDRC

Institutions:
Uganda – Infectious Diseases Research Collaboration, Ministry of Health (all aspects)
University of California San Francisco (all aspects)
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (Surveillance, Immunology)
Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (Resistance – Insecticide)
University of Florida (Surveillance – Modeling)
Johns Hopkins University (Surveillance – Modeling)
Durham University (Surveillance – Entomology)

Surveillance Project Leaders : Moses Kamya; Sarah Staedke

Immunology Project Leaders : Harriet Mayanja-Kizza; Chris Drakeley

Resistance Project Leaders : Samuel Nsobya; Philip Rosenthal; Martin Donnelly

Administrative Project Leaders : Grant Dorsey; Moses Kamya

Laboratory Core Project Leaders : Samuel Nsobya; Philip Rosenthal

Data Core Leaders Project Leaders : Edwin Charlebois; Geoff Lavoy

Training Program Leaders Project Leaders : Sarah Staedke; Fred Wabwire-Mangen

Program for Resistance, Immunology, Surveillance and Modeling of Malaria in Uganda (PRISM) is the dedicated East Africa International Center of Excellence for Malaria Research. The International Center of Excellence for Malaria Research (ICEMR) program, created by NIAID/NIH in July 2010, established a global network of independent research centers in malaria-endemic settings to provide knowledge, tools, and evidence-based strategies to support researchers working in a variety of settings, especially within governments and healthcare institutions.

The overall strategy of the multi-project PRISM program is to apply a comprehensive and iterative approach to malaria surveillance that will generate an evidence base to help maximize the impact of control interventions across a wide range of epidemiological settings. Our approach is designed to address the complexity of interactions between the mosquito vector, malaria parasite, and human host, and combine standard malaria surveillance techniques and metrics with cutting-edge methods designed to improve surveillance. In addition, there will be a strong emphasis on capacity building and translation of research findings into policy. The research component of this program include three individual projects (Surveillance, Resistance, and Immunology) which are supported by 3 core units (Administration, Data and Laboratory). Training and local capacity building is also a key feature of the ICEMR program.

The overall objects of the PRISM program:

• Perform comprehensive surveillance studies aimed to improve understanding of the disease and measure the impact of population-level control interventions

• Comprehensive approach to surveillance will bring together expertise from multiple disciplines to collect data across multiple levels, reflecting the complex nature of interactions between the mosquito vector, malaria parasite and human host

• Studies will be conducted in six sentinel sites, ranging from areas of relatively low transmission intensity to areas with some of the highest transmission intensities recorded in the world

• A strong emphasis will be placed on local training and capacity building, transfer of technology, and building strong relationships between researchers and policy makers.